Will the FCC reevaluate E-rate's role in school cybersecurity protections? – K-12 Dive




Matsui’s plea to the FCC comes after the U.S. Government Accountability Office recently pointed out a lack of federal agency cooperation on K-12 cybersecurity. The watchdog agency in October wrote that the U.S. Department of Education and the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency “have little to no interaction with other agencies and the K-12 community” over cybersecurity in schools. 
The FCC’s E-rate program, which provides significant discounts for school internet connections and telecommunications infrastructure, covers basic firewall services. “Though these basic firewalls may be productive in preventing some of the most routine and unsophisticated cyber threats, they fall far short of adequately addressing the threat landscape schools face today,” Matsui wrote.
In a recent survey of 2,085 E-rate applicants from schools and libraries, an overwhelming 98% said they want network security included in the FCC program. That survey was released in October by consulting firm Funds For Learning. 
Additionally, a November letter from five companies, including Microsoft and Cisco, urged the FCC to add advanced firewalls to its E-rate program, as recommended by Funds For Learning. The annual cap on this cybersecurity expense should be $60 million, the letter suggested. 
The companies further called for increased collaboration between the Education Department, FBI and CISA to “help develop a long-term strategy for ensuring our schools and libraries can protect themselves in an ever-evolving cyber threat landscape.”
Meanwhile, K-12 schools continue to be a notable target for malicious cyberattacks, according to the Multi-State Information Sharing and Analysis Center. 
The MS-ISAC report found schools are typically under-resourced and unprepared to handle major cyberattacks. In fact, the report said the average school spends just 8% of its IT budget on cybersecurity.
CISA also announced in November that K-12 schools would be among its priority sectors, along with water and hospitals, in 2023.
Get the free daily newsletter read by industry experts
Photo illustration: Shaun Lucas/Industry Dive; Getty Images
These leaders are shaping the nation’s schools with commitments to high expectations, strong relationships and robust career exploration models.
As schools continue returning to in-person learning, administrators are confronting learning loss, content controversies and other challenges.
Subscribe to K-12 Dive for top news, trends & analysis
Get the free daily newsletter read by industry experts
Photo illustration: Shaun Lucas/Industry Dive; Getty Images
These leaders are shaping the nation’s schools with commitments to high expectations, strong relationships and robust career exploration models.
As schools continue returning to in-person learning, administrators are confronting learning loss, content controversies and other challenges.
The free newsletter covering the top industry headlines

source


CyberTelugu

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker

Refresh Page