What AIIMS server “hijack” tells us about cyber security: Every database is vulnerable, and our defences a – Times of India




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A selection of essays appearing in the middle of the TOI Edit Page
Mishi Choudhary and Faisal Farooqui
For days, hundreds of dedicated healthcare professionals at Delhi’s prestigious AIIMS had to work with pen and paper to register a sea of patients waiting in long queues after a ransomware attack. What should have been a seamless task of admitting patients in the hospital or rendering check-ups and diagnostic services in the outpatient department had to be done as it was in the 1970s and 80s.
This is because on November 23 the core or main servers of AIIMS were hijacked (or held hostage) by an unknown, faceless enemy who could have been operating as a single individual or a group or organisation. The servers were partially restored on December 6 and online appointments were restored earlier this week.
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