Report Cybersecurity Issues – Texas Department Of Transportation

Report Cybersecurity Issues – Texas Department of Transportation

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Have you been a victim of a phishing attack, a spoofing email, or an attempt to mislead you by someone impersonating an employee of TxDOT? There are persistent cybersecurity threats to business and individuals. It is important that TxDOT partners and the public remain vigilant in keeping threats at bay. As cybersecurity criminals become more sophisticated in their methods, it is important that you do your part in understanding and identifying threats and being secure.
Protect yourself by being on the lookout for the most current cybersecurity threats identified in the Alerts section below, and report any suspected emails or other cybersecurity threats using the Cybersecurity Incident Form. To learn more about the different trends within cybersecurity, like email phishing, review the FAQ’s below, and visit our Resources page for pertinent cybersecurity documentation.
Reported phishing attacks targeting TxDOT staff, vendors, and trusted business partners have significantly increased in recent months.
While the threat of phishing and social engineering always requires vigilance and careful evaluation, understanding individual trends within phishing is vital to identifying and circumventing related threats. One such trend, sometimes known as “spoofing” or email impersonation, is actively on the rise.Spoof Graphic
Spoofing is the act of impersonating or disguising an email communication from an unknown source as being from a known, trusted source.
Cybercriminals are sending spoofed (impersonated) emails — appearing to be from a TxDOT office — inviting recipients to fulfill a certain task included with the spoofed emails. These emails are not from TxDOT.
The display name of a sender can easily be manipulated to show any text. However, by fully reviewing the sender’s email address, you can identify mismatched or inaccurate details and domains.
TxDOT emails will always end with @txdot.gov. Please report any related examples of TxDOT spoofed emails via the Cybersecurity Incident Form below.
Contact us Report an issue Ask a question File a complaint
Cybersecurity Incident Notifications will be treated as confidential under Texas Government Code 552.139, Confidentiality of Government Information Related to Security or Infrastructure Issues for Computers
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Spoofing is the act of impersonating or disguising an email communication from an unknown source as being from a known, trusted source. The goal of email spoofing is to get the recipients to open and even respond to the request.
The display name of a sender can easily be manipulated to show any text. However, by fully reviewing the sender’s email address, you can identify mismatched or inaccurate details and domains.
TxDOT emails will always end with txdot.gov. Be on the look out for those that have been altered in anyway.Spoofing Example Sp
If you receive a spoofing email:
Please report any related examples of TxDOT spoofed emails via the Cybersecurity Incident Form below.
A phishing attack is the action or set of actions that the hacker takes in order to exploit the user. Poorly crafted emails for the classic email phishing scheme are often easy to spot due to poor grammar or misspelled words. The attackers are getting better and more technically sophisticated with the attacks that they launch. Though often simple messages, they can be very effective.
Phishing is primarily used in reference to generic email attacks where the attacker sends out emails to as many addresses as possible. The emails can state something about your account being compromised, so in order to catch as many people as possible they will use more commonly used services. The email will state something about your account having been compromised and that you need to click on this link and verify that everything is ok, or not. The link will usually do one of two things, or both:
You can refresh your memory of what to look out for with the tips below. Remember that it is better to be safe than sorry.
When in doubt, make sure to validate the legitimacy of an email by contacting the sender (if trusted) or another trusted source before sending a reply or opening any attachments.
What is Social Engineering?

Social engineers use manipulation to trick and deceive you into unintentionally providing information and access to places, data, or systems. They may use email, as in phishing attacks, or a variety of other means including requests made in person, over social media, on voice calls (AKA vishing) and SMS text messages (AKA SMiShing).

Social engineering scams rely on human interaction, communication, and a sense of urgency to convince you to trust the exchange. They use techniques that exploit an established relationship, include a sense of urgency, and, or a form of heightened emotion.

To overcome social engineering threats, remember to always validate requests prior to responding, confirm identity whenever possible, be careful of opening unsolicited emails, links, or attachments, never share sensitive information, and always report suspicious activity.
To make a report, please contact us through the Cybersecurity Incident Form.

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