Cybersecurity stepped up for Paris 2024 Olympics – Insidethegames.biz




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The team responsible for cybersecurity at the Paris 2024 Olympics have launched a series of exercises aimed at preventing a repetition of attacks at the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics through a programme of cyber malware dubbed “Olympic Destroyer.”
“2018 was a milestone in the technological history of the Olympic Games,” Paris 2024 head of cybersecurity Franz Regul said, as reported by Le Monde.
“For many people we met, it was traumatic,” he admitted.
During the Pyeongchang 2018 Opening Ceremony, many technological systems failed to work, including captions for the television broadcast signal.
The attacks were carried out using cyber malware dubbed “Olympic Destroyer.”
“Among the incident response teams that will work for us, there are also veterans of 2018,” Regul said.
Early drills undertaken included a “restoration exercise” of main systems known as the active directory.
“The first exercise I conducted was a restoration exercise,” Regul confirmed.
A cybersecurity centre is set to be operational throughout the Games and will be administered jointly by cybersecurities and operations partner Atos and Cisco, partner for technology solutions.
Funding for security and cybersecurity has also been increased by an additional €40 million (£34 million/$42 million) in measures announced last week.
There is also due to be a threat analysis unit, responsible for identifying possible areas of risk.
This is set to work closely with the French National Information Systems Security Agency (ANSSI) and the cyber division of the gendarmerie.
These are expected to prioritise measures related to spectator safety such as the security of ticketing.
The committee is understood to be monitoring domain names and social networks on the web as part of its activities.
“The first concern is any scenario that would have consequences for the safety of people, such as the compromise of a system linked to access control,” Regul added.
There is also expected to be reinforcement of technology in areas such as timing mechanisms for sports events.
“Omega has almost doubled all of its processes, so if, for example, the ‘photo finish’ system fails, there is a second ‘photo finish’ and a judge who are there to intervene,” he said.
Other areas of concern include the technology around anti-doping.
“If we take the case of a country which for anti-doping commission reasons can no longer send athletes, its goal will be to ensure, for example, that the Olympics go as badly as possible,” Kaspersky anti-virus expert Ivan Kwiatkowski said, as reported by Le Monde.
Official online applications used by the Organising Committee and the personal data of individuals such as journalists reporting the Games are also considered likely targets.
In 2020, six Russian intelligence officers were charged by United States federal prosecutors with unleashing the “Olympic Destroyer” at Pyeongchang 2018 although their cases have never been brought to court.
Before the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, a number of threats to the Organising Committee’s online systems were also identified.
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For nearly 15 years now, insidethegames.biz has been at the forefront of reporting fearlessly on what happens in the Olympic Movement. As the first website not to be placed behind a paywall, we have made news about the International Olympic Committee, the Olympic and Paralympic Games, the Commonwealth Games and other major events more accessible than ever to everybody. 
insidethegames.biz has established a global reputation for the excellence of its reporting and breadth of its coverage. For many of our readers from more than 200 countries and territories around the world the website is a vital part of their daily lives. The ping of our free daily email alert, sent every morning at 6.30am UK time 365 days a year, landing in their inbox, is as a familiar part of their day as their first cup of coffee.
Even during the worst times of the COVID-19 pandemic, insidethegames.biz maintained its high standard of reporting on all the news from around the globe on a daily basis. We were the first publication in the world to signal the threat that the Olympic Movement faced from the coronavirus and have provided unparalleled coverage of the pandemic since. 
As the world begins to emerge from the COVID crisis, insidethegames.biz would like to invite you to help us on our journey by funding our independent journalism. Your vital support would mean we can continue to report so comprehensively on the Olympic Movement and the events that shape it. It would mean we can keep our website open for everyone. Last year, nearly 25 million people read insidethegames.biz, making us by far the biggest source of independent news on what is happening in world sport. 
Every contribution, however big or small, will help maintain and improve our worldwide coverage in the year ahead. Our small and dedicated team were extremely busy last year covering the re-arranged Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo, an unprecedented logistical challenge that stretched our tight resources to the limit. 
The remainder of 2022 is not going to be any less busy, or less challenging. We had the Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games in Beijing, where we sent a team of four reporters, and coming up are the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, the Summer World University and Asian Games in China, the World Games in Alabama and multiple World Championships. Plus, of course, there is the FIFA World Cup in Qatar.
Unlike many others, insidethegames.biz is available for everyone to read, regardless of what they can afford to pay. We do this because we believe that sport belongs to everybody, and everybody should be able to read information regardless of their financial situation. While others try to benefit financially from information, we are committed to sharing it with as many people as possible. The greater the number of people that can keep up to date with global events, and understand their impact, the more sport will be forced to be transparent.
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